KTVU Fox 2 News | Paul Ash Talks Public Charge

August 18, 2019

News that the Trump Administration has decided to finalize the Public Charge Rule has hit our community hard. This decision essentially forces immigrant families to choose between getting the food they need through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP or CalFresh in California) or jeopardizing their chance to remain legally in the U.S. Many of these people will choose to suffer without food. It’s objectionable that we as a country offer benefits like SNAP only to have our own government discourage hard working, well-meaning people from using them.

Our Executive Director Paul Ash spoke about policies that harm our immigrant communities with KTVU Fox 2 News Anchor Claudine Wong on set – airing on Sunday morning, 8/18/19.

San Francisco Chronicle | How new Trump ‘public charge’ rule will leave families hungry | Paul Ash Op-Ed

August 15, 2019

News that the Trump Administration had decided to finalize the Public Charge Rule has hit our community hard.  This decision essentially forces immigrant families to choose between getting the food they need through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP or CalFresh in California) or jeopardizing their chance to remain legally in the U.S.  Many of these people will choose to suffer without food. It’s objectionable that we as a country offer benefits like SNAP only to have our own government discourage hard working, well-meaning people from using them.

Read more from our Executive Director Paul Ash on the subject of Public Charge in this Op-Ed that was published in the San Francisco Chronicle on Thursday, August 15th

Edible San Francisco | The Last Black Woman in San Francisco Wants Everyone To Eat Well

August 4, 2019

Rachel Bolden-Kramer grew up in San Francisco, the single child of working-class parents, was raised in the Upper Haight in the 1980s and 90s.  Her dad, who has roots in the American South, was a driver; her Jewish mom worked for the phone company.  Today, she is literally a poster child for San Francisco, as she is featured as one of 15 portraits on permanent display at the Ferry Building as part of CUESA’s Food Change public art mural installation that celebrates farmers, advocates, and residents who are working to improve the region’s food systems. 

She spoke to reporter/writer Sarah Henry for this profile piece for Edible San Francisco, in which she speaks positively about the San Francisco-Marin Food Bank. 

Triple Pundit | Breaking Down Local and National Efforts to Improve Food Security in the U.S.

June 25, 2019

Across the U.S., millions of people face penetrating physical, mental and emotional diminishment caused by systemic hunger. But why are people waging an existential battle with hunger in the richest and among the most agriculturally productivecountries in the world?

The causes and correlations are complex and varied, of course, but the underlying issue is food insecurity. The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines food insecurity as “a lack of of consistent access to food for an active, healthy life.” As such, food insecurity reaches beyond the personal discomfort of hunger and encompasses the spectrum of sociological, economic, and political inputs that lead a daily hunt or want of food.

Read more from freelance Reporter Thomas Scheuneman in Triple Pundit.

Media Coverage | Negroni Week 2019

June 12, 2019

Imbibe Magazine launched Negroni Week in 2013 as a celebration of one of the world’s great cocktails and an effort to raise money for charities around the world, including ours!

Since 2013, Negroni Week has grown from about 120 participating venues to almost 10,000 venues around the world, and to date, they have collectively raised about $2 million for charitable causes.

Check out some of the great coverage of Negroni Week 2019

The New York Times

Imbibe Magazine’s Food Bank “Negroni Week” Profile

And this mention on Hoodline  

Edible Marin and Wine Country Magazine | Hidden Hunger

June 1, 2019

POCKETS OF POVERTY REVEAL WIDESPREAD FOOD INSECURITY HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT IN LAND OF PLENTY

This is a region of farm-fresh abundance and dining excellence. It’s also a place of scarcity for people like fixed-income seniors living in subsidized housing in Tiburon. Or the two-income Sausalito couple who hit hard times when the husband, coping with an expensive, chronic health condition, lost his business. Or students in Marin, Sonoma and Napa counties who struggle to pay the cost of going to college while keeping up with classwork. Or young immigrant families in San Rafael’s Canal District, whose adults often hold down multiple jobs. Or the soon-to-graduate single mom on a limited budget living in low-income housing in Marin City. Or the motley crew of West Marin individualists with limited financial resources in San Geronimo. Or farm laborers in Napa. Or residents displaced by fire or flood in Sonoma.  There is need in every nook and cranny here.

Read more on this series of hunger stories from reporter Sarah Henry in Edible Marin and Wine Country Magazine.