San Francisco-Marin Food Bank Year-End Fundraising Needs Community Boost

December 27, 2021

San Francisco – Marin Food Bank Year-End Fundraising Needs Community Boost

60% of the Food Bank’s Annual Budget Needs Raising Before End of 2021

SAN FRANCISCO, CA (December 27, 2021) The San Francisco-Marin Food Bank (SFMFB) faces increased challenges during the giving season from the persistent high need for food assistance. Pandemic-related food insecurity in the Bay Area continues and is intensified by supply chain impacts, causing the food bank’s budget to increase by 50% in 2021. 

Higher transportation costs and food prices, food scarcity, and labor shortages compound the Food Bank’s ability to combat food insecurity. The overall impact results in higher Food Bank expenses to fulfill the current need for food assistance in San Francisco and Marin. 

“We need to raise 60% of our annual budget in the last few days of the year to fulfill the financial goals required to meet the needs of our community,” said Tanis Crosby, San Francisco-Marin Food Bank Executive Director. “We’re working to keep up with rising food prices from supply chain problems, but it all puts a huge strain on our financial resources, making year-end giving more critical, and with the Omicron variant surging, we are deeply concerned that the need for food assistance will keep growing into a significant part of 2022. We’re asking everyone in the community to step up and give whatever they can and join us in ending hunger,” she added. 

The Bay Area pandemic-related economic effects have not waned. Every week, the Food Bank distributes one million meals to over 50,000 households. In comparison, before the pandemic, the Food Bank served 32,000 households per week. 

The San Francisco-Marin Food Bank is sending out a call for monetary donations to meet its year-end fundraising goal. During December, every dollar donated will be triple-matched. To donate, visit: https://www.sfmfoodbank.org/, to volunteer, please visit: https://www.sfmfoodbank.org/volunteer/.

Available for phone and in-person interviews: Barbara Abbot, Vice President of Supply Chain for the San Francisco-Marin Food Bank. 

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ABOUT SAN FRANCISCO-MARIN FOOD BANK 

San Francisco-Marin Food Bank’s mission is to end hunger in San Francisco and Marin. Before the pandemic, one in five neighbors was at risk of hunger. We address hunger head-on – from our pantry network and home-delivered groceries to CalFresh enrollment. Every week, over 50,000 households count on us for food assistance. Nearly 60 percent of what we distribute is fresh fruits and vegetables. Learn more at www.sfmfoodbank.org 

Supply Chain Issues Strain San Francisco-Marin Food Bank Resources

November 16, 2021

Supply Chain Issues Strain San Francisco-Marin Food Bank Resources

Rising food and transportation costs stretch capacity to fulfill food assistance need during the holidays and beyond

SAN FRANCISCO (November 16, 2021) Supply chain challenges pose a significant obstacle in providing for the high rate of food insecurity in San Francisco and Marin this holiday season and into the foreseeable future. Higher transportation costs, food prices, food scarcity, and labor shortages compound the Food Bank’s ability to fulfill the persistent need for food assistance generated from the pandemic. The overall impact results in higher Food Bank costs to fulfill the current need for food assistance in San Francisco and Marin.

Although the Food Bank has succeeded in securing food in the coming holiday months, the rising costs and food scarcity have stretched its resources. From the first quarter of 2021, eggs prices increased 65%, the cost of produce per pound is about 16% higher, and the price of chicken has doubled. “This year, many of us will celebrate the holiday and enjoy a special meal with our families and friends. We must ensure that all our neighbors can do the same,” said Barbara Abbott, Vice President of Supply Chain for the San Francisco-Marin Food Bank. “We have worked hard to overcome the barriers caused by the supply chain to meet the increased need for food assistance since the pandemic, but it puts tremendous strain on our financial resources, and our volunteer capacity is over-extended.”

Despite the waning pandemic health impacts in San Francisco and Marin, its economic implications still abound, exemplifying that there’s no vaccine for hunger. The number of neighbors needing food assistance is still high. Every week, the Food Bank distributes one million meals to over 50,000 households (184,000 people). In comparison, before the pandemic, the Food Bank served 32,000 households/week.

The heightened need shows no sign of lowering in the foreseeable future–a recent survey of over 7,000 of the Food Bank’s participants showed that 81% had yet to recover. 61% of respondents replied that a household member had lost their job or is earning less money. The same survey showed that as many as 50% did not seek food assistance before the pandemic.

The San Francisco-Marin Food Bank is sending out a call for monetary donations and volunteers to help provide food this holiday season and into 2022. To donate, visit: https://www.sfmfoodbank.org/, to volunteer, please visit: https://www.sfmfoodbank.org/volunteer/.

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ABOUT SAN FRANCISCO-MARIN FOOD BANK

San Francisco-Marin Food Bank’s mission is to end hunger in San Francisco and Marin. Before the pandemic, one in five neighbors was at risk of hunger. We address hunger head-on – from our pantry network and home-delivered groceries to CalFresh enrollment. Every week, over 50,000 households count on us for food assistance. Nearly 60 percent of what we distribute is fresh fruits and vegetables. Learn more at www.sfmfoodbank.org

West Coast Poultry Leader Foster Farms Continues Fight Against Hunger, Donates Thanksgiving Turkeys to Feed More Than 80,000 People in Need

November 10, 2021

WEST COAST POULTRY LEADER FOSTER FARMS CONTINUES FIGHT AGAINST HUNGER, DONATES THANKSGIVING TURKEYS TO FEED MORE THAN 80,000 PEOPLE IN NEED


LIVINGSTON, Calif. – Oct. 28, 2021 As the economic impact of the pandemic – and corresponding food insecurity – continues for American families, Foster Farms renews its holiday hunger relief efforts this week with a 64,000-pound turkey donation to West Coast food banks. This donation will bring the comfort of a holiday meal to more than 80,000 people in need across three states to help address staggering food assistance needs. In the coming weeks, Foster Farms will deliver thousands of holiday turkeys to food banks from Seattle to San Diego.

According to Feeding America, an estimated 42 million people, including 13 million children, remain dependent on food assistance and are vulnerable to hunger. In California alone, one out of every five residents – eight million people – do not know where their next meal is coming from.

As part of its ongoing commitment to address food insecurity, Foster Farms has an annual tradition of donating Thanksgiving turkeys to local hunger relief organizations, most of which have partnered with the company for the last 13 years. One longtime partner in the fight against hunger is San Francisco-Marin Food Bank, which will feed 10,000 people with the 8,000 pounds of turkey donated by Foster Farms.

“Since the pandemic began, we have seen nearly twice as many families turn to us. The need continues as a majority have yet to recover, and there is no vaccine for hunger,” said San Francisco-Marin Food Bank Executive Director Tanis Crosby. “We are grateful to Foster Farms for its continued generosity, especially during the holidays. Their donation will be a hand up again this year to the thousands in Northern California who are still struggling to make ends meet.”

“At Foster Farms, we remain dedicated to fighting hunger in our local communities and are proud to continue our tradition of donating Thanksgiving turkeys, especially this year, as families return to more traditional Thanksgiving celebrations,” said Ira Brill, vice president of communications for Foster Farms. “We hope that others who are able will join us in supporting their local food bank by donating food, money or time.”

 

 

Among the organizations receiving turkey donations this year are:

 

Second Harvest Food Bank

Manteca, Calif.

Donate Here

 

San Francisco-Marin Food Bank

San Francisco

Donate Here

 

Northwest Harvest

Seattle

Donate Here

Merced County Food Bank

Merced, Calif.

Donate Here

Sacramento Food Bank & Family Services

Sacramento, Calif.

Donate Here

 

 

About Foster Farms

Since 1939, West Coast families have depended on Foster Farms for premium quality chicken and turkey products. Family-owned and operated, the company continues its legacy of excellence and commitment to quality established by its founders, Max and Verda Foster. Foster Farms specializes in fresh, all-natural chicken and turkey products free of preservatives, additives, or injected sodium enhancers. Based in California’s Central Valley, with ranches in the Pacific Northwest, the company’s fresh chicken and turkey are produced in or near each region served. Foster Farms also produces delicious pre-marinated, ready-to-cook and fully cooked products that meet the quality and convenience needs of today’s home cooks, retailers, warehouse clubs and foodservice customers. The company’s commitment to excellence, honesty, quality, service, and people is a source of great pride, and a longtime family tradition.

Food safety is Foster Farms’ highest priority, and the company would like to remind consumers to always follow safe handling, preparation, and storage guidelines for the preparation of fresh poultry products. All fresh poultry products should be cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit as measured by a meat thermometer to ensure safety. Visit www.fosterfarms.com to learn more.

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Editor’s note: For interviews about turkey donations and accompanying community needs, photos and video footage of donations, please contact Heidi White at media@finemanpr.com

Hunger Report Shows Pandemic Related Food Insecurity Persists Despite Bay Area COVID-19 Recovery

November 10, 2021

Hunger Report Shows Pandemic Related Food Insecurity Persists Despite Bay Area COVID-19 Recovery

 

SAN FRANCISCO (September 17, 2021) – Today, the San Francisco-Marin Food Bank released its Hunger Report that included a survey of more than 7,000 Food Bank participants. The survey reveals that 81% of respondents have yet to recover from the pandemic’s economic impact. Many respondents reported they lost work or had reduced income due to the pandemic. 61% of respondents replied that a household member has lost their job or is earning less money. Nearly 50% did not receive food from a pantry before the pandemic.

 

While the pandemic shone a light on food insecurity and the inequities that underpin it, these are not new issues. Even before COVID-19 drove record unemployment, 1 in 5 San Francisco and Marin neighbors was at risk of hunger. The past year’s events were simply a catalyst that forced thousands more to turn to Food Banks and other forms of support for the first time. As entire industries eroded, the Food Bank saw nearly twice as many families turn to them for food, many for the first time.

 

“We’re heartened that we’re able to ramp up operations to fulfill the increase in the need for food. Yet, providing a bag of groceries will not solve the continued inequities of food insecurity in San Francisco and Marin,” said Tanis Crosby, Executive Director, San Francisco-Marin Food Bank. We all need to push for policy changes at the local, state, and federal levels to address the root causes of hunger that predate COVID-19 and that were brought to light by the pandemic.”

 

The Food Bank continues to evolve operations to serve the community most effectively. Every week, over 50,000 households are served (before the pandemic, the Food Bank served 32,000 households per week), more than 8,000 of those received home-delivered groceries.

 

September is Hunger Action Month, a nationwide initiative to raise awareness of community hunger and an ideal time to help. Visit www.sfmfoodbank.org for how to volunteer, donate, or advocate.

 

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ABOUT SAN FRANCISCO-MARIN FOOD BANK

San Francisco-Marin Food Bank’s mission is to end hunger in San Francisco and Marin. Before the pandemic, one in five neighbors was at risk of hunger. We envision a community where everyone can obtain enough nutritious food in a dignified manner to support the health and well-being of themselves and their families. We address hunger head-on – from our pantry network and home-delivered groceries to our nutrition-education classes and CalFresh enrollment, and we work in many ways to nourish and serve neighbors in need. Every week, 55,000 households count on us for food assistance. Nearly 60 percent of what we distribute is fresh fruits and vegetables. Learn more at www.sfmfoodbank.org

Food Bank Breaks Ground on Building Expansion

July 26, 2021

San Francisco-Marin Food Bank Breaks Ground on Building Expansion

San Francisco, CA (July 26, 2021) – This Thursday the San Francisco-Marin Food Bank will celebrate the groundbreaking of its new San Francisco warehouse expansion. Speakers at the event will include Mayor London Breed, Food Bank Executive Director Tanis Crosby and members of the Food Bank’s Board of Directors.

The expanded facility – which is expected to open in Spring 2022 – will add:

  • An additional 32,000 square feet, extending into the current parking lot on the north of the facility at 900 Pennsylvania Ave., San Francisco, CA.
  • Two additional loading docks, adding 50% more capacity: from 8 inbound trucks per day to 12 to 15 per day.
  • 5,200 square feet of cold storage space.
  • The ability to engage up to 500 partner organizations compared to 380 currently.
  • Space to host an additional 20,000 volunteers a year.

Together with the building it acquired in Marin in 2018, this will allow the Food Bank to distribute 75 million pounds annually from its two primary facilities, serving up to 200,000 people per week.

WHEN: 5 p.m., Thursday, July 29, 2021

WHERE: San Francisco-Marin Food Bank Warehouse, 900 Pennsylvania Ave, San Francisco, CA

EVENT SPEAKERS: Mayor London Breed; Scott Brubaker, Board Chair, San Francisco-Marin Food Bank; Joseph Sáenz, Board Member, San Francisco-Marin Food Bank; Tanis Crosby, Executive Director, San Francisco-Marin Food Bank

SPOKESPERSON AVAILABLITY: Tanis Crosby, Executive Director of The San Francisco-Marin Food Bank will be available for pull aside interviews following the speaking program. Mayor London Breed’s staff will be on site and manage her availability.

PHOTO/B-ROLL OPPORTUNITIES: Construction underway; Food Bank facilities; b-roll of an active warehouse prepping for morning deliveries

ON-SITE MEDIA CONTACT: Keely Hopkins, khopkins@sfmfoodbank.org, (415) 792-8346

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ABOUT THE SAN FRANCISCO-MARIN FOOD BANK

San Francisco-Marin Food Bank’s mission is to end hunger in San Francisco and Marin. Before the pandemic, one in five neighbors was at risk of hunger. We envision a community where everyone can obtain enough nutritious food in a dignified manner to support the health and well-being of themselves and their families. We address hunger head-on – from our pantry network and home-delivered groceries to our nutrition-education classes and CalFresh enrollment, and we work in many ways to nourish and serve neighbors in need. Every week, 55,000 households count on us for food assistance. Nearly 60 percent of what we distribute is fresh fruits and vegetables. Learn more at www.sfmfoodbank.org.

KRON4 | Founder’s Day| Food Costs Are Rising

June 23, 2021

It’s not just on grocery store shelves, we are seeing higher food prices in our supply chain too. Driven by increased transportation costs, labor shortages, and supply and demand ground beef is up more than 70% compared to pre-pandemic and the price of chicken rose over 400%. Director of Food Services, Angela Wirch shares more.

The Food Bank is Expanding

April 29, 2021

The San Francisco-Marin Food Bank Expands San Francisco Warehouse

Warehouse Expansion Will Supported Continued Elevated Need for Food Assistance

San Francisco, CA (April 29, 2021) – The San Francisco-Marin Food Bank will break ground this Spring to add an additional 32,000 square feet to its San Francisco warehouse facilities. Together with the building it acquired in Marin in 2018, this will allow the Food Bank to distribute 75 million pounds annually from its two primary facilities, serving up to 200,000 people per week.

“When the Food Bank started this project 5 years ago the goal was to build for the future, but it turns out we are building for right now,” said Tanis Crosby, Executive Director San Francisco-Marin Food Bank. “Before the pandemic, the Food Bank was already a vital lifeline for 140,000 people every week. The economic crisis brought on by COVID-19 forced thousands more to turn to us for help. We are no longer renovating just to expand, but to sustain – it’s about creating the space necessary to provide food for our neighbors who are making real, practical choices every day about where they’re spending scarce dollars.”

To reach the thousands who needed food assistance for the first time during the pandemic, the Food Bank cobbled together a combination of tents and rented warehouse space. Managing eight separate warehouses is incredibly complex. In addition to the cost related to space, transportation, and coordination, the Food Bank has been less efficient than it could be if it were all in one location.

The expanded facility – which is expected to open in Spring 2022 – is an opportunity to meet those we weren’t serving before over the long term – not just in crisis. It will include:

  • An additional 32,000 square feet, extending into the current parking lot on the north of the facility at 900 Pennsylvania, San Francisco, CA.
  • Two additional loading docks, adding 50% more capacity: from 8 inbound trucks per day to 12-15 per day.
  • 5,200 square feet of cold storage space.
  • The ability to engage up to 500 partner organizations compared to 380 currently.
  • Space to host an additional 20,000 volunteers a year.

The newly renovated and purchased building in Marin was completed in early 2020 – that building will serve as a blueprint for our expansion in San Francisco. But to ensure both facilities not only can hold the food need, but pump it directly to where its most needed, the Food Bank needs to raise an additional $3.5 million to fund vitally important infrastructure like the forklifts, trucks, solar panels, and refrigeration systems.

Learn more about the expansion project:

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ABOUT THE SAN FRANCISCO-MARIN FOOD BANK

San Francisco-Marin Food Bank’s mission is to end hunger in San Francisco and Marin. Before the pandemic, one in five neighbors was at risk of hunger. We envision a community where everyone can obtain enough nutritious food in a dignified manner to support the health and well-being of themselves and their families. We address hunger head-on – from our pantry network and home-delivered groceries to our nutrition-education classes and CalFresh enrollment, and we work in many ways to nourish and serve neighbors in need. Every week, 55,000 households count on us for food assistance. Nearly 60 percent of what we distribute is fresh fruits and vegetables. Learn more at www.sfmfoodbank.org.

MEDIA CONTACT

Keely Hopkins, Communications and Social Media Manager

O: 415-282-1900, ext. 292 | C: 415-792-8346

khopkins@sfmfoodbank.org

Pop-up Pantries Relocate as Public Spaces Reopen

April 15, 2021

The San Francisco-Marin Food Bank Relocates Pop-up Pantries as Public Spaces Reopen

San Francisco and Marin, CA (April 15, 2021) — As public spaces throughout San Francisco and Marin reopen as COVID restrictions are lifted the San Francisco-Marin Food Bank will be moving a number of Pop-up Pantry locations. This includes, but isn’t limited to, several Pop-up Pantries at school sites that will move next week as schools reopen.

We know it will take a long time for many of our neighbors to get back on their feet due to the impacts of COVID-19 and we will find solutions to ensure we can continue to serve those in our community who need food assistance. If and when a Pop-up Pantry needs to relocate, we will inform all existing participants in advance and ensure the new location has enough capacity for all existing enrolled participants. Participants should also visit https://www.sfmfoodbank.org/find-food/ or call (628) 272-8340 for the latest pantry location information.

The Food Bank is committed to meeting the need for food in our community and continues to have room to support new participants.

For those in need of food assistance: The Food Bank continues to have capacity at many pantries, and we are expanding eligibility for home grocery delivery. We have also significantly reduced the wait times in line at the pantries Visit https://www.sfmfoodbank.org/find-food/ or call (628) 272-8340 to find a pantry near you and learn about all the Food Bank’s programs.

To support the Food Bank: As our community reopens, we still need volunteers to keep our programs running. Most shifts are outside, and masking and distancing protocols remain in place. To volunteer visit: https://www.sfmfoodbank.org/volunteer/.

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ABOUT SAN FRANCISCO-MARIN FOOD BANK

San Francisco-Marin Food Bank’s mission is to end hunger in San Francisco and Marin. Before the pandemic, one in five neighbors was at risk of hunger. We envision a community where everyone is able to obtain enough nutritious food in a dignified manner to support the health and well-being of themselves and their families. We address hunger head on: from our pantry network and home-delivered groceries to our nutrition-education classes and food-stamp enrollment, we work in many ways to nourish and empower neighbors in need. Every week, 55,000 households count on us for food assistance. Nearly 60 percent of what we distribute is fresh fruits and vegetables. Learn more at www.sfmfoodbank.org.

MEDIA CONTACT

Keely Hopkins, Communications and Social Media Manager

O: 415-282-1900, ext. 292 | C: 415-792-8346

khopkins@sfmfoodbank.org

KTVU Fox 2 News | Paul Ash Talks Public Charge

August 18, 2019

News that the Trump Administration has decided to finalize the Public Charge Rule has hit our community hard. This decision essentially forces immigrant families to choose between getting the food they need through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP or CalFresh in California) or jeopardizing their chance to remain legally in the U.S. Many of these people will choose to suffer without food. It’s objectionable that we as a country offer benefits like SNAP only to have our own government discourage hard working, well-meaning people from using them.

Our Executive Director Paul Ash spoke about policies that harm our immigrant communities with KTVU Fox 2 News Anchor Claudine Wong on set – airing on Sunday morning, 8/18/19.

San Francisco Chronicle | How new Trump ‘public charge’ rule will leave families hungry | Paul Ash Op-Ed

August 15, 2019

News that the Trump Administration had decided to finalize the Public Charge Rule has hit our community hard.  This decision essentially forces immigrant families to choose between getting the food they need through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP or CalFresh in California) or jeopardizing their chance to remain legally in the U.S.  Many of these people will choose to suffer without food. It’s objectionable that we as a country offer benefits like SNAP only to have our own government discourage hard working, well-meaning people from using them.

Read more from our Executive Director Paul Ash on the subject of Public Charge in this Op-Ed that was published in the San Francisco Chronicle on Thursday, August 15th